Volcanic eruption in the Philippines

The most active volcano in the Philippines is well known for its perfect cone shape — which actually signals how dangerous the volcano can be. Its geology and location could soon combine in explosive, and deadly, fashion.

A huge column of ash shoots up to the sky during the eruption of Mayon volcano Monday, Jan. 22, 2018 as seen from Daraga township, Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines. The Philippines’ most active volcano erupted Monday prompting the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology to raise the Alert level to 4 from last week’s alert level 3. (AP Photo/Dan Amaranto)

 

Students passes through the rice paddy as they run away from cascading volcanic materials from the slopes of Mayon Volcano in Guinobatan, Albay province, south of Metro Manila, Philippines January 22, 2018. REUTERS/Rhadyz Barcia NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES – RC1B284FDA10

 

A fisherman unloads fishing gear during a mild eruption of the Mayon volcano at sunrise, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018 outside Legazpi city, Albay province, roughly 340 kilometers (200 miles), southeast of Manila, Philippines. The Mayon volcano has been erupting for almost two weeks in the Philippines still appears to be swelling with magma under the surface, scientists said Thursday. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

 

Mayon volcano erupts for the second straight day Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018 as seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, southeast of Manila, Philippines. The Philippines’ most active volcano ejected a huge column of lava fragments, ash and smoke in another thunderous explosion at dawn Tuesday, sending thousands of villagers back to evacuation centers and prompting a warning that a violent eruption may be imminent. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

 

Pyroclastic materials cascade down the slopes of Mayon volcano during another eruption as seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018. Lava fountaining regularly from the Philippines’ most active volcano has flowed up to 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the crater in a dazzling but increasingly dangerous eruption. Mount Mayon has spewed lava up to 600 meters (2,000 feet) high at times Tuesday and early Wednesday and its ash plumes stretched up to 5 kilometers (3 miles) above the crater. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

 

Lava cascades down the slopes of the Mayon volcano seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, 340 kilometers (210 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines, Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018. Over 9,000 people have evacuated the area around the Philippines’ most active volcano as lava flowed down its crater Monday in a gentle eruption that scientists warned could turn explosive. (AP Photo/Dan Amaranto)

 

Mayon volcano spews red-hot lava in another eruption as seen from Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018. Lava fountaining regularly from the Philippines’ most active volcano has flowed up to 3 kilometers (1.86 miles) from the crater in a dazzling but increasingly dangerous eruption. Mount Mayon has spewed lava up to 600 meters (2,000 feet) high at times Tuesday and early Wednesday and its ash plumes stretched up to 5 kilometers (3 miles) above the crater. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

 

This photo taken from a drone shows a column of ash shooting up from the Mayon volcano as it continues to erupt, seen from the city of Legazpi in Albay province, south of Manila on January 24, 2018.
Thousands more residents fled an erupting volcano in the Philippines, relief workers said on January 24, as foreign tourists flocked to the area to watch spectacular flaming lava and giant cauliflower clouds spurting from its crater. / AFP PHOTO / CHARISM SAYAT (Photo credit should read CHARISM SAYAT/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Ash rises up from the Mayon volcano as it continues to erupt, seen from the town of Daraga in Albay province, south of Manila on January 24, 2018.
Thousands more residents fled an erupting volcano in the Philippines, relief workers said on January 24, as foreign tourists flocked to the area to watch spectacular flaming lava and giant cauliflower clouds spurting from its crater. / AFP PHOTO / LINUS ESCANDOR II (Photo credit should read LINUS ESCANDOR II/AFP/Getty Images)

 

Residents, wearing masks, go on their daily business as Mayon volcano’s eruption plunge some townships in darkness Monday, Jan. 22, 2018 in Legazpi city, Albay province, around 340 kilometers (200 miles) southeast of Manila, Philippines. The Philippines’ most active volcano erupted Monday prompting the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology to raise the Alert level to 4 from last week’s alert level 3. (AP Photo/Dan Amaranto)

 

TOPSHOT – Lave flows from Mayon volcano at it continues to erupt as seen from Legazpi in Albay province, south of Manila, on January 25, 2018.
Philippine authorities who have declared a no-go zone around an erupting volcano said January 25 they will remove all holdouts, by force if necessary, to avoid casualties after tens of thousands of other residents fled to safety. / AFP PHOTO / TED ALJIBE (Photo credit should read TED ALJIBE/AFP/Getty Images)

Source – theatlantic.com

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